Science Enabled by Specimen Data

Cours, J., Larrieu, L., Lopez-Vaamonde, C., Müller, J., Parmain, G., Thorn, S., & Bouget, C. (2021). Contrasting responses of habitat conditions and insect biodiversity to pest- or climate-induced dieback in coniferous mountain forests. Forest Ecology and Management, 482, 118811. doi:10.1016/j.foreco.2020.118811 https://doi.org/10.1016/j.foreco.2020.118811

Natural disturbances are major drivers of forest dynamics. However, in the current context of anthropogenic global warming, shifts in disturbance regimes are expected. Natural disturbances usually leave biological or structural legacies which are important for early-successional species. Nevertheles…

Deanna, R., Wilf, P., & Gandolfo, M. A. (2020). New physaloid fruit‐fossil species from early Eocene South America. American Journal of Botany, 107(12), 1749–1762. doi:10.1002/ajb2.1565 https://doi.org/10.1002/ajb2.1565

Premise: Solanaceae is a scientifically and economically important angiosperm family with a minimal fossil record and an intriguing early evolutionary history. Here, we report a newly discovered fossil lantern fruit with a suite of features characteristic of Physalideae within Solanaceae. The fossil…

Jayathilake, D. R. M., & Costello, M. J. (2020). A modelled global distribution of the kelp biome. Biological Conservation, 252, 108815. doi:10.1016/j.biocon.2020.108815 https://doi.org/10.1016/j.biocon.2020.108815

Kelp, seaweeds of the order Laminariales, are of ecological and conservation importance because they form undersea forest habitat for many varieties of fauna and flora including mammals, and commercial fish species. In the absence of a world map of the kelp biome, we predicted its potential distribu…

Zanatta, F., Engler, R., Collart, F., Broennimann, O., Mateo, R. G., Papp, B., … Vanderpoorten, A. (2020). Bryophytes are predicted to lag behind future climate change despite their high dispersal capacities. Nature Communications, 11(1). doi:10.1038/s41467-020-19410-8 https://doi.org/10.1038/s41467-020-19410-8

The extent to which species can balance out the loss of suitable habitats due to climate warming by shifting their ranges is an area of controversy. Here, we assess whether highly efficient wind-dispersed organisms like bryophytes can keep-up with projected shifts in their areas of suitable climate.…

Rozefelds, A. C., Stull, G., Hayes, P., & Greenwood, D. R. (2020). The fossil record of Icacinaceae in Australia supports long-standing Palaeo-Antarctic rainforest connections in southern high latitudes. Historical Biology, 1–11. doi:10.1080/08912963.2020.1832089 https://doi.org/10.1080/08912963.2020.1832089

Fossil fruits of Icacinaceae are recorded from two Cenozoic sites in Australia, at Launceston in northern Tasmania and the Poole Creek palaeochannel in northern South Australia, representing the first report of fossil Icacinaceae from Australia. The Launceston material includes two endocarps with br…

Yi, S., Jun, C.-P., Jo, K., Lee, H., Kim, M.-S., Lee, S. D., … Lim, J. (2020). Asynchronous multi-decadal time-scale series of biotic and abiotic responses to precipitation during the last 1300 years. Scientific Reports, 10(1). doi:10.1038/s41598-020-74994-x https://doi.org/10.1038/s41598-020-74994-x

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Bazzicalupo, A. L., Whitton, J., & Berbee, M. L. (2019). Over the hills, but how far away? Estimates of mushroom geographic range extents. Journal of Biogeography. doi:10.1111/jbi.13617 https://doi.org/10.1111/jbi.13617

Aim: Geographic distributions of mushroom species remain poorly understood despite their importance for advancing our understanding of the habitat requirements, species interactions and ecosystem functions of this key group of organisms. Here, we estimate geographic range extents (maximum within‐spe…

Chase, B. M., Boom, A., Carr, A. S., Chevalier, M., Quick, L. J., Verboom, G. A., & Reimer, P. J. (2019). Extreme hydroclimate response gradients within the western Cape Floristic region of South Africa since the Last Glacial Maximum. Quaternary Science Reviews, 219, 297–307. doi:10.1016/j.quascirev.2019.07.006 https://doi.org/10.1016/j.quascirev.2019.07.006

The Cape Floristic Region (CFR) is one of the world's major biodiversity hotspots, and much work has gone into identifying the drivers of this diversity. Considered regionally in the context of Quaternary climate change, climate stability is generally accepted as being one of the major factors promo…

Joyce, E., Thiele, K., Slik, F., & Crayn, D. (2020). Checklist of the vascular flora of the Sunda-Sahul Convergence Zone. Biodiversity Data Journal, 8. doi:10.3897/bdj.8.e51094 https://doi.org/10.3897/bdj.8.e51094

Background The Sunda-Sahul Convergence Zone, defined here as the area comprising Australia, New Guinea, and Southeast Asia (Indonesia to Myanmar), straddles the Sunda and Sahul continental shelves and is one of the most biogeographically famous and important regions in the world. Floristically, it i…

Zizka, A., Antunes Carvalho, F., Calvente, A., Rocio Baez-Lizarazo, M., Cabral, A., Coelho, J. F. R., … Antonelli, A. (2020). No one-size-fits-all solution to clean GBIF. PeerJ, 8, e9916. doi:10.7717/peerj.9916 https://doi.org/10.7717/peerj.9916

Species occurrence records provide the basis for many biodiversity studies. They derive from georeferenced specimens deposited in natural history collections and visual observations, such as those obtained through various mobile applications. Given the rapid increase in availability of such data, th…