Science Enabled by Specimen Data

Li, X., Li, B., Wang, G., Zhan, X., & Holyoak, M. (2020). Deeply digging the interaction effect in multiple linear regressions using a fractional-power interaction term. MethodsX, 7, 101067. doi:10.1016/j.mex.2020.101067 https://doi.org/10.1016/j.mex.2020.101067

In multiple regression Y ~ β0 + β1X1 + β2X2 + β3X1 X2 + ɛ., the interaction term is quantified as the product of X1 and X2. We developed fractional-power interaction regression (FPIR), using βX1M X2N as the interaction term. The rationale of FPIR is that the slopes of Y-X1 regression along the X2 gr…

Daniel, J., Horrocks, J., & Umphrey, G. J. (2019). Efficient Modelling of Presence-Only Species Data via Local Background Sampling. Journal of Agricultural, Biological and Environmental Statistics. doi:10.1007/s13253-019-00380-4 https://doi.org/10.1007/s13253-019-00380-4

In species distribution modelling, records of species presence are often modelled as a realization of a spatial point process whose intensity is a function of environmental covariates. One way to fit a spatial point process model is to apply logistic regression to an artificial case–control sample c…

Ezray, B. D., Wham, D. C., Hill, C. E., & Hines, H. M. (2019). Unsupervised machine learning reveals mimicry complexes in bumblebees occur along a perceptual continuum. Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, 286(1910), 20191501. doi:10.1098/rspb.2019.1501 https://doi.org/10.1098/rspb.2019.1501

Müllerian mimicry theory states that frequency-dependent selection should favour geographical convergence of harmful species onto a shared colour pattern. As such, mimetic patterns are commonly circumscribed into discrete mimicry complexes, each containing a predominant phenotype. Outside a few exam…

Rankin, A.M., R.S. Schwartz, C.H. Floyd, and K.E. Galbreath. (2019). Contrasting consequences of historical climate change for marmots at northern and temperate latitudes. Journal of Mammalogy. doi:10.3897/zookeys.830.31490 https://doi.org/10.1093/jmammal/gyz025

Many species that occupy high latitudes of North America were historically restricted to relatively small refugia during the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM). The geographic ranges of many of these species then expanded widely across the continent after glacial ice receded. In contrast, species whose LGM …