Science Enabled by Specimen Data

Zhou, W., X. Ji, S. Obata, A. Pais, Y. Dong, R. Peet, and Q.-Y. (Jenny) Xiang. 2018. Resolving relationships and phylogeographic history of the Nyssa sylvatica complex using data from RAD-seq and species distribution modeling. Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 126: 1–16. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ympev.2018.04.001

Nyssa sylvatica complex consists of several woody taxa occurring in eastern North America. These taxa were recognized as two or three species including three or four varieties by different authors. Due to high morphological similarities and complexity of morphological variation, classification and d…

Reichgelt, T., C. K. West, and D. R. Greenwood. 2018. The relation between global palm distribution and climate. Scientific Reports 8. https://doi.org/10.1038/s41598-018-23147-2

Fossil palms provide qualitative evidence of (sub-) tropical conditions and frost-free winters in the geological past, including modern cold climate regions (e.g., boreal, or polar climates). The freeze intolerance of palms varies across different organs and life stages, with seedlings in particular…

Faurby, S., and M. B. Araújo. 2018. Anthropogenic range contractions bias species climate change forecasts. Nature Climate Change 8: 252–256. https://doi.org/10.1038/s41558-018-0089-x

Forecasts of species range shifts under climate change most often rely on ecological niche models, in which characterizations of climate suitability are highly contingent on the species range data used. If ranges are far from equilibrium under current environmental conditions, for instance owing to …

Escobar-Anleu, B. I., J. M. Quiñónez-Guzmán, and J. M. Mora. 2018. Filling distribution gaps of a little-known endemic species, Rojasianthe superba Standl. & Steyerm. (Asteraceae) in northern Central America. Check List 14: 267–275. https://doi.org/10.15560/14.1.267

Rojasianthe superba Standl. & Steyerm. (Asteraceae) is an endemic species, limited to a few localities in Mexico and Guatemala. Here we report a new occurrence point at a departmental scale in Guatemala; it also extends its known distribution by 40 km to the northeast. We ran species distribution mo…

Manchego, C. E., P. Hildebrandt, J. Cueva, C. I. Espinosa, B. Stimm, and S. Günter. 2017. Climate change versus deforestation: Implications for tree species distribution in the dry forests of southern Ecuador R. Zang [ed.],. PLOS ONE 12: e0190092. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0190092

Seasonally dry forests in the neotropics are heavily threatened by a combination of human disturbances and climate change; however, the severity of these threats is seldom contrasted. This study aims to quantify and compare the effects of deforestation and climate change on the natural spatial range…

Sundue, M. A. 2017. Ceradenia spectabilis (Polypodiaceae), a New Species from Cerro del Torrá, Colombia. American Fern Journal 107: 193–199. https://doi.org/10.1640/0002-8444-107.4.193

Ceradenia spectabilis, a new species, is described from Cerro del Torrá, an isolated peak in western Colombia well known for harboring rare and narrowly distributed species of plants. The new species is readily distinguished from its congeners by its broadly alate petiole and rachis, creeping rhizom…

Jurd, D., and M. Pole. 2017. Miocene “fin-winged” fruits and Pliocene drift fruits – the first record of Combretaceae (Terminalia) from New Zealand. Geobios 50: 423–429. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.geobios.2017.10.002

Two types of fossil Terminalia (Combretaceae) fruits are described from warmer periods in New Zealand’s past. One is represented by large ‘fin-winged’ fruit (samara) from the Early Miocene Manuherikia Group sediments of Bannockburn and the Nevis Valley. The form and size of the fruits are entirely u…

Caudullo, G., E. Welk, and J. San-Miguel-Ayanz. 2017. Chorological maps for the main European woody species. Data in Brief 12: 662–666. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.dib.2017.05.007

A novel chorological data compilation for the main European tree and shrub species is presented. This dataset was produced by combining numerous and heterogeneous data collected from 20th century atlas monographs providing complete species distribution maps, and from more recent national to regional…

Grossenbacher, D. L., Y. Brandvain, J. R. Auld, M. Burd, P. Cheptou, J. K. Conner, A. G. Grant, et al. 2017. Self‐compatibility is over‐represented on islands. New Phytologist 215: 469–478. https://doi.org/10.1111/nph.14534

Because establishing a new population often depends critically on finding mates, individuals capable of uniparental reproduction may have a colonization advantage. Accordingly, there should be an over-representation of colonizing species in which individuals can reproduce without a mate, particularl…

Antonelli, A., H. Hettling, F. L. Condamine, K. Vos, R. H. Nilsson, M. J. Sanderson, H. Sauquet, et al. 2016. Toward a Self-Updating Platform for Estimating Rates of Speciation and Migration, Ages, and Relationships of Taxa. Systematic Biology: syw066. https://doi.org/10.1093/sysbio/syw066

Rapidly growing biological data –including molecular sequences and fossils– hold an unprecedented potential to reveal how evolutionary processes generate and maintain biodiversity. However, researchers often have to develop their own idiosyncratic workflows to integrate and analyse these data for re…