Science Enabled by Specimen Data

Briscoe Runquist, R. D., Lake, T. A., & Moeller, D. A. (2021). Improving predictions of range expansion for invasive species using joint species distribution models and surrogate co‐occurring species. Journal of Biogeography. doi:10.1111/jbi.14105 https://doi.org/10.1111/jbi.14105

Aims: Species distribution models (SDMs) are often used to forecast potential distributions of important invasive or rare species. However, situations where models could be the most valuable ecologically or economically, such as for predicting invasion risk, often pose the greatest challenges to SDM…

Follak, S., Bakacsy, L., Essl, F., Hochfellner, L., Lapin, K., Schwarz, M., … Wołkowycki, D. (2021). Monograph of invasive plants in Europe N°6: Asclepias syriaca L. Botany Letters, 1–30. doi:10.1080/23818107.2021.1886984 https://doi.org/10.1080/23818107.2021.1886984

This work synthesizes all aspects of Asclepias syriaca L. (Apocynaceae) including the taxonomy, distribution, history of introduction and spread, ecology, biology, uses and benefits, impacts on biodiversity and agriculture, legislation, and management. Asclepias syriaca is a perennial broad-leaved s…

Cahyaningsih, R., Magos Brehm, J., & Maxted, N. (2021). Gap analysis of Indonesian priority medicinal plant species as part of their conservation planning. Global Ecology and Conservation, 26, e01459. doi:10.1016/j.gecco.2021.e01459 https://doi.org/10.1016/j.gecco.2021.e01459

Indonesia is a country rich in medicinal plant biodiversity. The conservation and sustainable use of such species in Indonesia are critical because of incipient population growth, changing land usage, forest clearance, and climate change in a country where most of the population depends on tradition…

Pang, S. E. H., De Alban, J. D. T., & Webb, E. L. (2021). Effects of climate change and land cover on the distributions of a critical tree family in the Philippines. Scientific Reports, 11(1). doi:10.1038/s41598-020-79491-9 https://doi.org/10.1038/s41598-020-79491-9

Southeast Asian forests are dominated by the tree family Dipterocarpaceae, whose abundance and diversity are key to maintaining the structure and function of tropical forests. Like most biodiversity, dipterocarps are threatened by deforestation and climate change, so it is crucial to understand the …

SETYAWAN, A. D., Supriatna, J., Nisyawati, Nursamsi, I., SUTARNO, S., SUGIYARTO, S., … INDRAWAN, M. (2020). Anticipated climate changes reveal shifting in habitat suitability of high-altitude selaginellas in Java, Indonesia. Biodiversitas Journal of Biological Diversity, 21(11). doi:10.13057/biodiv/d211157 https://doi.org/10.13057/biodiv/d211157

Anticipated climate changes reveal shifting in habitat suitability of high-altitude selaginellas in Java, Indonesia. Biodiversitas 21: 5482-5497. High-altitude ecosystems with humid and cool climate are the preferred habitat for some Selaginella species (selaginellas). Such habitats are available in…

Deanna, R., Wilf, P., & Gandolfo, M. A. (2020). New physaloid fruit‐fossil species from early Eocene South America. American Journal of Botany, 107(12), 1749–1762. doi:10.1002/ajb2.1565 https://doi.org/10.1002/ajb2.1565

Premise: Solanaceae is a scientifically and economically important angiosperm family with a minimal fossil record and an intriguing early evolutionary history. Here, we report a newly discovered fossil lantern fruit with a suite of features characteristic of Physalideae within Solanaceae. The fossil…

Iqbal, I., Shabbir, A., Shabbir, K., Barkworth, M., Bareen, F., & Khan, S. (2020). Evolvulus nummularius (L.) L. (Convolvulaceae): a new alien plant record for Pakistan. BioInvasions Records, 9(4), 702–711. doi:10.3391/bir.2020.9.4.04 https://doi.org/10.3391/bir.2020.9.4.04

Evolvulus nummularius (L.) L., a member of the Convolvulaceae, is native to Mexico and South America but nowadays grows around the world in many tropical and subtropical regions. Its presence in Pakistan, where it has become naturalized, is reported here for the first time. It was first discovered i…

Magri, D., Parra, I., Di Rita, F., Ni, J., Shichi, K., & Worth, J. R. P. (2020). Linking worldwide past and present conifer vulnerability. Quaternary Science Reviews, 250, 106640. doi:10.1016/j.quascirev.2020.106640 https://doi.org/10.1016/j.quascirev.2020.106640

Inventories of species recently extinct or threatened with extinction may be found in global databases. However, despite the large number of published fossil based-studies, specific databases on the vulnerability of species in the past are not available. We compiled a worldwide database of published…

Del Rio, C., Huang, J., Liu, P., Deng, W., Spicer, T. E. V., Wu, F., … Su, T. (2020). New Eocene fossil fruits and leaves of Menispermaceae from the central Tibetan Plateau and their biogeographic implications. Journal of Systematics and Evolution. doi:10.1111/jse.12701 https://doi.org/10.1111/jse.12701

Menispermaceae are a pantropical and temperate family with an extensive fossil record during the Paleogene, especially in North America and Europe, but with much less evidence from Asia. The latest fossil evidence indicates a succession of tropical to sub‐tropical flora on the central Tibetan Platea…

Rozefelds, A. C., Stull, G., Hayes, P., & Greenwood, D. R. (2020). The fossil record of Icacinaceae in Australia supports long-standing Palaeo-Antarctic rainforest connections in southern high latitudes. Historical Biology, 1–11. doi:10.1080/08912963.2020.1832089 https://doi.org/10.1080/08912963.2020.1832089

Fossil fruits of Icacinaceae are recorded from two Cenozoic sites in Australia, at Launceston in northern Tasmania and the Poole Creek palaeochannel in northern South Australia, representing the first report of fossil Icacinaceae from Australia. The Launceston material includes two endocarps with br…