Science Enabled by Specimen Data

Inman, R., Franklin, J., Esque, T., & Nussear, K. (2021). Comparing sample bias correction methods for species distribution modeling using virtual species. Ecosphere, 12(3). doi:10.1002/ecs2.3422 https://doi.org/10.1002/ecs2.3422

A key assumption in species distribution modeling (SDM) with presence‐background (PB) methods is that sampling of occurrence localities is unbiased and that any sampling bias is proportional to the background distribution of environmental covariates. This assumption is rarely met when SDM practition…

Orr, M. C., Hughes, A. C., Chesters, D., Pickering, J., Zhu, C.-D., & Ascher, J. S. (2020). Global Patterns and Drivers of Bee Distribution. Current Biology. doi:10.1016/j.cub.2020.10.053 https://doi.org/10.1016/j.cub.2020.10.053

Insects are the focus of many recent studies suggesting population declines, but even invaluable pollination service providers such as bees lack a modern distributional synthesis. Here, we combine a uniquely comprehensive checklist of bee species distributions and >5,800,000 public bee occurrence re…

Seaborn, T., Goldberg, C. S., & Crespi, E. J. (2020). Drivers of distributions and niches of North American cold‐adapted amphibians: evaluating both climate and land use. Ecological Applications. doi:10.1002/eap.2236 https://doi.org/10.1002/eap.2236

Species distribution estimates are often used to understand the niche of a species; however, these are often based solely on climatic predictors. When the influences of biotic factors are ignored, erroneous inferences about range and niche may be made. We aimed to integrate climate data with a uniqu…

Zizka, A., Antunes Carvalho, F., Calvente, A., Rocio Baez-Lizarazo, M., Cabral, A., Coelho, J. F. R., … Antonelli, A. (2020). No one-size-fits-all solution to clean GBIF. PeerJ, 8, e9916. doi:10.7717/peerj.9916 https://doi.org/10.7717/peerj.9916

Species occurrence records provide the basis for many biodiversity studies. They derive from georeferenced specimens deposited in natural history collections and visual observations, such as those obtained through various mobile applications. Given the rapid increase in availability of such data, th…

Li, X., Li, B., Wang, G., Zhan, X., & Holyoak, M. (2020). Deeply digging the interaction effect in multiple linear regressions using a fractional-power interaction term. MethodsX, 7, 101067. doi:10.1016/j.mex.2020.101067 https://doi.org/10.1016/j.mex.2020.101067

In multiple regression Y ~ β0 + β1X1 + β2X2 + β3X1 X2 + ɛ., the interaction term is quantified as the product of X1 and X2. We developed fractional-power interaction regression (FPIR), using βX1M X2N as the interaction term. The rationale of FPIR is that the slopes of Y-X1 regression along the X2 gr…

Grünig, M., Calanca, P., Mazzi, D., & Pellissier, L. (2020). Inflection point in climatic suitability of insect pest species in Europe suggests non‐linear responses to climate change. Global Change Biology. doi:10.1111/gcb.15313 https://doi.org/10.1111/gcb.15313

Climate change and globalization affect the suitable conditions for agricultural crops and insect pests, threatening future food security. It remains unknown whether shifts in species’ climatic suitability will be linear or rather non‐linear, with crop exposure to pests suddenly increasing when a cr…

Deb, J. C., Forbes, G., & MacLean, D. A. (2020). Modelling the spatial distribution of selected North American woodland mammals under future climate scenarios. Mammal Review. doi:10.1111/mam.12210 https://doi.org/10.1111/mam.12210

North America has a diverse array of mammalian species. Model projections indicate significant variations in future climate conditions of North America, and the habitats of woodland mammals of this continent may be particularly sensitive to changes in climate.We report on the potential spatial distr…

Rankin, A.M., R.S. Schwartz, C.H. Floyd, and K.E. Galbreath. (2019). Contrasting consequences of historical climate change for marmots at northern and temperate latitudes. Journal of Mammalogy. doi:10.3897/zookeys.830.31490 https://doi.org/10.1093/jmammal/gyz025

Many species that occupy high latitudes of North America were historically restricted to relatively small refugia during the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM). The geographic ranges of many of these species then expanded widely across the continent after glacial ice receded. In contrast, species whose LGM …

Karger, D. N., Kessler, M., Conrad, O., Weigelt, P., Kreft, H., König, C., & Zimmermann, N. E. (2019). Why tree lines are lower on islands-Climatic and biogeographic effects hold the answer. Global Ecology and Biogeography. doi:10.1111/geb.12897 https://doi.org/10.1111/geb.12897

Aim: To determine the global position of tree line isotherms, compare it with observed local tree limits on islands and mainlands, and disentangle the potential drivers of a difference between tree line and local tree limit. Location: Global. Time period: 1979–2013. Major taxa studied: Trees. Method…

Liu, X., Blackburn, T. M., Song, T., Li, X., Huang, C., & Li, Y. (2019). Risks of Biological Invasion on the Belt and Road. Current Biology, 29(3), 499–505.e4. doi:10.1016/j.cub.2018.12.036 https://doi.org/10.1016/j.cub.2018.12.036

China’s Belt and Road Initiative (BRI) is an unprecedented global development program that involves nearly half of the world’s countries [1]. It not only will have economic and political influences, but also may generate multiple environmental challenges and is a focus of considerable academic and p…