Science Enabled by Specimen Data

Bontrager, M., Usui, T., Lee‐Yaw, J. A., Anstett, D. N., Branch, H. A., Hargreaves, A. L., … Angert, A. L. (2021). Adaptation across geographic ranges is consistent with strong selection in marginal climates and legacies of range expansion. Evolution. doi:10.1111/evo.14231 https://doi.org/10.1111/evo.14231

Every species experiences limits to its geographic distribution. Some evolutionary models predict that populations at range edges are less well‐adapted to their local environments due to drift, expansion load, or swamping gene flow from the range interior. Alternatively, populations near range edges…

Saldaña‐López, A., Vilà, M., Lloret, F., Manuel Herrera, J., & González‐Moreno, P. (2021). Assembly of species’ climatic niches of coastal communities does not shift after invasion. Journal of Vegetation Science, 32(2). doi:10.1111/jvs.12989 https://doi.org/10.1111/jvs.12989

Question: Do invasions by invasive plant species with contrasting trait profiles (Arctotheca calendula, Carpobrotus spp., Conyza bonariensis, and Opuntia dillenii) change the climatic niche of coastal plant communities? Location: Atlantic coastal habitats in Huelva (Spain). Methods: We identifi…

Géron, C., Lembrechts, J. J., Borgelt, J., Lenoir, J., Hamdi, R., Mahy, G., … Monty, A. (2021). Urban alien plants in temperate oceanic regions of Europe originate from warmer native ranges. Biological Invasions. doi:10.1007/s10530-021-02469-9 https://doi.org/10.1007/s10530-021-02469-9

When colonizing new areas, alien plant species success can depend strongly on local environmental conditions. Microclimatic barriers might be the reason why some alien plant species thrive in urban areas, while others prefer rural environments. We tested the hypothesis that the climate in the native…

Lynn, J. S., Klanderud, K., Telford, R. J., Goldberg, D., & Vandvik, V. (2021). Macroecological context predicts species’ responses to climate warming. Global Change Biology. doi:10.1111/gcb.15532 https://doi.org/10.1111/gcb.15532

Context‐dependencies in species’ responses to the same climate change frustrate attempts to generalize and make predictions based on experimental and observational approaches in biodiversity science. Here, we propose predictability may be enhanced by explicitly incorporating macroecological context …

Allstädt, F. J., Koutsodendris, A., Appel, E., Rösler, W., Reichgelt, T., Kaboth-Bahr, S., … Pross, J. (2021). Late Pliocene to early Pleistocene climate dynamics in western North America based on a new pollen record from paleo-Lake Idaho. Palaeobiodiversity and Palaeoenvironments. doi:10.1007/s12549-020-00460-1 https://doi.org/10.1007/s12549-020-00460-1

Marked by the expansion of ice sheets in the high latitudes, the intensification of Northern Hemisphere glaciation across the Plio/Pleistocene transition at ~ 2.7 Ma represents a critical interval of late Neogene climate evolution. To date, the characteristics of climate change in North America duri…

Lozano, V. (2021). Distribution of Five Aquatic Plants Native to South America and Invasive Elsewhere under Current Climate. Ecologies, 2(1), 27–42. doi:10.3390/ecologies2010003 https://doi.org/10.3390/ecologies2010003

Biological invasions and climate pose two of the most important challenges facing global biodiversity. Certainly, climate change may intensify the impacts of invasion by allowing invasive plants to increase in abundance and further expand their ranges. For example, most aquatic alien plants in tempe…

Shaw, E. C., Fowler, R., Ohadi, S., Bayly, M. J., Barrett, R. A., Tibbits, J., … Cousens, R. D. (2020). Explaining the worldwide distributions of two highly mobile species: Cakile edentula and Cakile maritima. Journal of Biogeography. doi:10.1111/jbi.14024 https://doi.org/10.1111/jbi.14024

Aim: If we are able to determine the geographic origin of an invasion, as well as its known area of introduction, we can better appreciate the innate environmental tolerance of a species and the strength of selection for adaptation that colonizing populations have undergone. It also enables us to ma…

Brendel, M. R., Schurr, F. M., & Sheppard, C. S. (2020). Inter‐ and intraspecific selection in alien plants: How population growth, functional traits and climate responses change with residence time. Global Ecology and Biogeography. doi:10.1111/geb.13228 https://doi.org/10.1111/geb.13228

Aim: When alien species are introduced to new ranges, climate or trait mismatches may initially constrain their population growth. However, inter‐ and intraspecific selection in the new environment should cause population growth rates to increase with residence time. Using a species‐for‐time approac…

Deanna, R., Wilf, P., & Gandolfo, M. A. (2020). New physaloid fruit‐fossil species from early Eocene South America. American Journal of Botany, 107(12), 1749–1762. doi:10.1002/ajb2.1565 https://doi.org/10.1002/ajb2.1565

Premise: Solanaceae is a scientifically and economically important angiosperm family with a minimal fossil record and an intriguing early evolutionary history. Here, we report a newly discovered fossil lantern fruit with a suite of features characteristic of Physalideae within Solanaceae. The fossil…

Brandt, A. J., Bellingham, P. J., Duncan, R. P., Etherington, T. R., Fridley, J. D., Howell, C. J., … Peltzer, D. A. (2020). Naturalised plants transform the composition and function of the New Zealand flora. Biological Invasions. doi:10.1007/s10530-020-02393-4 https://doi.org/10.1007/s10530-020-02393-4

The New Zealand flora has a high proportion of endemic species but has been invaded by almost the same number of non-native plant species. To support management of invasive plant species, we provide an updated inventory of New Zealand’s naturalised flora and compare it with the native flora to ident…