Science Enabled

Bontrager, M., Usui, T., Lee‐Yaw, J. A., Anstett, D. N., Branch, H. A., Hargreaves, A. L., … Angert, A. L. (2021). Adaptation across geographic ranges is consistent with strong selection in marginal climates and legacies of range expansion. Evolution. doi:10.1111/evo.14231 https://doi.org/10.1111/evo.14231

Every species experiences limits to its geographic distribution. Some evolutionary models predict that populations at range edges are less well‐adapted to their local environments due to drift, expansion load, or swamping gene flow from the range interior. Alternatively, populations near range edges…

Rock, B. M., & Daru, B. H. (2021). Impediments to Understanding Seagrasses’ Response to Global Change. Frontiers in Marine Science, 8. doi:10.3389/fmars.2021.608867 https://doi.org/10.3389/fmars.2021.608867

Uncertainties from sampling biases present challenges to ecologists and evolutionary biologists in understanding species sensitivity to anthropogenic climate change. Here, we synthesize possible impediments that can constrain research to assess present and future seagrass response from climate chang…

Inman, R., Franklin, J., Esque, T., & Nussear, K. (2021). Comparing sample bias correction methods for species distribution modeling using virtual species. Ecosphere, 12(3). doi:10.1002/ecs2.3422 https://doi.org/10.1002/ecs2.3422

A key assumption in species distribution modeling (SDM) with presence‐background (PB) methods is that sampling of occurrence localities is unbiased and that any sampling bias is proportional to the background distribution of environmental covariates. This assumption is rarely met when SDM practition…

Briscoe Runquist, R. D., Lake, T. A., & Moeller, D. A. (2021). Improving predictions of range expansion for invasive species using joint species distribution models and surrogate co‐occurring species. Journal of Biogeography. doi:10.1111/jbi.14105 https://doi.org/10.1111/jbi.14105

Aims: Species distribution models (SDMs) are often used to forecast potential distributions of important invasive or rare species. However, situations where models could be the most valuable ecologically or economically, such as for predicting invasion risk, often pose the greatest challenges to SDM…

Saldaña‐López, A., Vilà, M., Lloret, F., Manuel Herrera, J., & González‐Moreno, P. (2021). Assembly of species’ climatic niches of coastal communities does not shift after invasion. Journal of Vegetation Science, 32(2). doi:10.1111/jvs.12989 https://doi.org/10.1111/jvs.12989

Question: Do invasions by invasive plant species with contrasting trait profiles (Arctotheca calendula, Carpobrotus spp., Conyza bonariensis, and Opuntia dillenii) change the climatic niche of coastal plant communities? Location: Atlantic coastal habitats in Huelva (Spain). Methods: We identifi…

Chauvel, B., Fried, G., Follak, S., Chapman, D., Kulakova, Y., Le Bourgeois, T., … Regnier, E. (2021). Monographs on invasive plants in Europe N° 5: Ambrosia trifida L. Botany Letters, 1–24. doi:10.1080/23818107.2021.1879674 https://doi.org/10.1080/23818107.2021.1879674

Ambrosia trifida L. (giant ragweed, Asteraceae) is native to the North American continent and was introduced into Europe and Asia at the end of the 19th century. In its native range, this tall annual species is common in riparian and ruderal habitats and is also a major weed in annual cropping syste…

Géron, C., Lembrechts, J. J., Borgelt, J., Lenoir, J., Hamdi, R., Mahy, G., … Monty, A. (2021). Urban alien plants in temperate oceanic regions of Europe originate from warmer native ranges. Biological Invasions. doi:10.1007/s10530-021-02469-9 https://doi.org/10.1007/s10530-021-02469-9

When colonizing new areas, alien plant species success can depend strongly on local environmental conditions. Microclimatic barriers might be the reason why some alien plant species thrive in urban areas, while others prefer rural environments. We tested the hypothesis that the climate in the native…

Singhal, S., Roddy, A. B., DiVittorio, C., Sanchez‐Amaya, A., Henriquez, C. L., Brodersen, C. R., … Zapata, F. (2021). Diversification, disparification and hybridization in the desert shrubs Encelia. New Phytologist. doi:10.1111/nph.17212 https://doi.org/10.1111/nph.17212

There are multiple hypotheses for the spectacular plant diversity found in deserts. We explore how different factors, including the roles of ecological opportunity and selection, promote diversification and disparification in Encelia, a lineage of woody plants in the deserts of the Americas. Using a…

Allstädt, F. J., Koutsodendris, A., Appel, E., Rösler, W., Reichgelt, T., Kaboth-Bahr, S., … Pross, J. (2021). Late Pliocene to early Pleistocene climate dynamics in western North America based on a new pollen record from paleo-Lake Idaho. Palaeobiodiversity and Palaeoenvironments. doi:10.1007/s12549-020-00460-1 https://doi.org/10.1007/s12549-020-00460-1

Marked by the expansion of ice sheets in the high latitudes, the intensification of Northern Hemisphere glaciation across the Plio/Pleistocene transition at ~ 2.7 Ma represents a critical interval of late Neogene climate evolution. To date, the characteristics of climate change in North America duri…

Puchałka, R., Dyderski, M. K., Vítková, M., Sádlo, J., Klisz, M., Netsvetov, M., … Jagodziński, A. M. (2020). Black locust ( Robinia pseudoacacia L.) range contraction and expansion in Europe under changing climate. Global Change Biology. doi:10.1111/gcb.15486 https://doi.org/10.1111/gcb.15486

Robinia pseudoacacia is one of the most frequent non‐native species in Europe. It is a fast‐growing tree of high economic and cultural importance. On the other hand, it is an invasive species, causing changes in soil chemistry and light regime, and consequently altering the plant communities. Previo…